Blog

Rebuilding a Zero Carbon Christchurch

This post reproduces the essay 'Next Generation Infrastructure' by Generation Zero members Peter Cockrem and Clayton Prest, which was published in the book Once in a Lifetime: City Building after Disaster in Christchurch by Freerange Press. The book contains 55 written and 39 visual essays, and includes a foreword by Helen Clark. It can be purchased here. Continue reading

We have a Big Ask - so what are the answers?

Our previous blog discussed our Big Ask - a Climate Change Act to sign binding emissions targets into law, and establish an independent Climate Commission to provide expert advice and hold the Government accountable. What do the political parties have to say about this? Continue reading

How Can Your Vote Shape a Low Carbon Future? Climate Law

Climate change is one of those problems where there's no silver bullet solution – no single technology, policy or action is going to solve it. The sources of carbon pollution are many and varied, and the solutions must be too. So far in our election blog series we've covered putting a price on carbon pollution and changing our transport policies. While these are both hugely important, they still only cover some of the tools in the full toolbox we need. Building a prosperous low carbon future requires a fundamental shift in our decision-making.  Continue reading

So What Are Parties Promising on Transport?

The last post was an explainer on how we can make changes to our transport system to make it better for the climate. Now we’re taking a look at party's policies. Continue reading

How Can My Vote Shape A Low Carbon Future? Transport

This is our second explainer on election policy. For a rundown of party policies on transport, check out this post. Transport accounts for the largest share of carbon dioxide emissions in New Zealand, and for 18% of our total greenhouse gas emissions. This means that there is a significant opportunity for us to cut carbon pollution by changing our transport system. This is also an opportunity to improve our balance of payments by reducing the amount of money we spend importing foreign oil. Our transport system currently depends almost entirely on oil, and at present this costs New Zealand roughly $5 billion per year. Continue reading

The Role of Kiwis in Protecting our Pacific Family

Last week, the Small Islands Developing States conference in Samoa ended with a call to action. With climate change already showing up in recent immigration cases, I think it’s time New Zealanders took notice.   In the latest reports, the World Bank has revealed that the effects of climate change are already taking a toll on small island Pacific nations. Low lying islands such as Tuvalu are faced with poor crop irrigation, storm damage, and contaminated drinking water.  I was surprised to find that these are all happening right now, and they’re raising some pretty big questions regarding New Zealand’s stance on carbon pollution and immigration. Continue reading

Want to Vote Centre-Right But Care About Climate Change? Here's How You can do Both.

"There is a time for weighing evidence and a time for acting. And if there’s one thing I’ve learned throughout my work in finance, government and conservation, it is to act before problems become too big to manage. For too many years, we failed to rein in the excesses building up in the nation’s financial markets. When the credit bubble burst in 2008, the damage was devastating. Millions suffered. Many still do. We’re making the same mistake today with climate change. We’re staring down a climate bubble that poses enormous risks to both our environmentand economy. The warning signs are clear and growing more urgent as the risks go unchecked." - HENRY M. PAULSON Jr.JUNE 21, 2014 (Chairman of the Paulson Institute at the University of Chicago and served as secretary of the Treasury from July 2006 to January 2009) in the New York Times piece The Coming Climate Crash on June 21, 2014. This post is for people who, for a variety of reasons, don’t want to vote for a left-wing party at this election. Last week at the end of the Climate Voter debate Tim Groser stated that he came along expecting not one person there to be a National voter, and left with his views confirmed. This is a devastating attitude for our Climate Change Minister to have, and he is not the first National Party MP to declare that the conversation around climate change is polarised. It doesn’t have to be, and what I’d like to do is explain why a centre-right voter can still be a climate voter this election. Continue reading

Green Party backs GZ's Fast Forward Wellington plan

Stoked! The Green Party has picked up on our blueprint for a world-class public transport network for Wellington with modern light rail, from our Fast Forward Wellington plan. Continue reading

For your viewing pleasure; Here are the best moments of the #climatevoter debate.

Last Wednesday over 13,000 NZers tuned in for the Great Climate Voter Debate, and the twittersphere was well and truly alive. Check out some of the highlights of the debate summarised in tweet form. (Watch the full debate here). Continue reading

So I Think We Should Put a Price on Carbon, but What Do Parties Think?

Our last blog had some information about carbon pricing, why it's important for the low-carbon transition and the current situation in New Zealand. Now we take a look at what parties are doing about it. We won’t tell you who to vote for - use this information to inform what you do. The sources of these policies are from the parties’ own websites, other public statements and actions they have taken over the last few years.   Continue reading